Author: <span class="vcard">Christine Ellington</span>

Happy Mother’s Day to all our McCune and Cousins women!  Here’s a photo  tribute to our Mothers who are no longer with us. We love them every one.   Mable Cousins McCune (4 Sept 1899 – 1 Sept 1983) Mother of Frances, Billy, Lucille, Evelyn, and James                   Frances McCune Dykes (1 Nov 1920 – 20 Aug 1992) Mother of Jeff, Donna, and Jan                   Lucille McCune Richards (4…

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Yum-yum! Fish fries in the deep South when everyone gathers around in the backyard at picnic tables and lawn chairs, waiting for Dad to serve up hot fresh catfish fillets from the spattering, gurgling deep fryer, along with all the ‘fixins,’ are a Southern ritual. Manning the cooker is almost a right of passage for the Southern male. But back in the day, in the 1950s-60s, the fish were fried indoors in the hot, humid Southern kitchens by the matriarchs of the family. Who doesn’t…

Blog Posts McCune

I haven’t been able to trace Frank’s travels very well due to a limited paper trail. Did he stay primarily in the Southeast or go wherever the train tracks and his inclination took him? How did he survive on a daily basis? Begging, borrowing, or stealing? Did he live in hobo jungles, or campsites, near the rail tracks? Did he suffer the hurt and humility of being thrown off a car by the railroad security known as bulls? I found a telling news article about…

Blog Posts McCune

Frank McCune allegedly returned home to America in 1919 after serving overseas as a World War I soldier. I haven’t found him in the 1920 U.S. census databases on Ancestry or Family Search. There are a lot of Frank McCunes, but not one who seems to be ours. He’s also not listed in the Columbus City Directories for 1921, 1923, 1925, 1927, and 1931. I’m assuming he was mostly on the road during the 1920s. He does show up in the 1928 Columbus City Directory…

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Wandering man, hobo, tramp, traveler, knight of the road, renegade, vagrant, transient, bum, drifter, homeless, rail rider. These are some of the terms that could describe the life of one of our ancestors, Great Uncle Frank McCune (1897-1946). Frank was Granddaddy Bill’s older brother, the first son of William and Carrie McCune. We know very little about him, and I’ve found no pictures of him. For reasons we can only speculate about, Frank roamed afar, mostly by catching rides on freight cars, and drifted back…

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Memories of Easters Past                     Cousins, do you have favorite Easter photos to share? Please do so we can all reminisce about our wonderful family memories!! Happy Easter to you all!! I welcome your comments on each post.

Blog Posts McCune

In genealogy, a brick wall is a term that refers to a person or item that stops you dead in your research tracks. One of my most aggravating brick walls on the McCune line is William and Frances McCune, our 3x great-grandparents, who lived in Alabama in the mid-1800s. I’ve searched for many, many years for their correct dates and places of birth and their dates and places of death. I don’t know who their parents were or the names of any of their siblings,…

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A couple of years ago, I had a DNA test through Ancestry.com to learn my ethnic origins and try to find distant cousins who might have additional information for our family tree. My results showed 70% Great Britain, 13% Western Europe, and 9% Ireland with the remaining 8% in Scandinavia, Iberian Peninsula, and Eastern Europe. I forwarded my DNA raw data from Ancestry to familytreedna.com to see what their test results would show: 75% British Isles (includes Ireland), 17% Scandinavia, 5% Eastern Europe, and 3%…

Blog Posts McCune

These are just a few of my childhood memories when Granddaddy and Grandmother McCune lived on 19th Street in Columbus, GA: I remember……. Grandmother’s buttermilk and lard biscuits running with melted butter. fried grouper and flounder, caught by Granddaddy in Destin, FL, cooked in a black iron skillet on the kitchen stove. No outdoor deep fryer for grandmother! heavy quilts on the fold-down sofa bed on cold winter nights. gas space heaters to fight off the chill. the creaking of the front porch swing and…

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It was a distinct honor for Colonel William P. Screws and his 167th Infantry to be part of the Army of Occupation in Germany following World War I. After unimaginable hardships in the final offensive assaults of the war in the fall of 1918, the men immediately began their march across Europe to Germany. They were greeted by cheering crowds and bands playing popular American songs in their trek through Belgium and Luxembourg. On 3 Dec 1918, they reached the Rhine River in Germany and…

Blog Posts McCune