Tag: Willie H. McCune

Several months ago, I wrote about our Granddaddy Bill McCune’s service in World War I in 1917- 1918 as a corporal in the 167th U.S. Infantry, 42nd Rainbow Division, stationed in France. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into the war.  The Library of Congress has a new website in commemoration of the anniversary, and I think our family members will find it very interesting, given our grandfather’s experience in the war.  Go here to see a wealth of information,…

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Yum-yum! Fish fries in the deep South when everyone gathers around in the backyard at picnic tables and lawn chairs, waiting for Dad to serve up hot fresh catfish fillets from the spattering, gurgling deep fryer, along with all the ‘fixins,’ are a Southern ritual. Manning the cooker is almost a right of passage for the Southern male. But back in the day, in the 1950s-60s, the fish were fried indoors in the hot, humid Southern kitchens by the matriarchs of the family. Who doesn’t…

Blog Posts McCune

It was a distinct honor for Colonel William P. Screws and his 167th Infantry to be part of the Army of Occupation in Germany following World War I. After unimaginable hardships in the final offensive assaults of the war in the fall of 1918, the men immediately began their march across Europe to Germany. They were greeted by cheering crowds and bands playing popular American songs in their trek through Belgium and Luxembourg. On 3 Dec 1918, they reached the Rhine River in Germany and…

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Corporal Willie H. McCune arrived in France as an 18-year-old tenderfoot soldier from Alabama in November 1917. To better understand his experience while there, I researched several books and websites that recreated the movements of the 167th Infantry, part of the 42nd Rainbow Division stationed on the Western Front in World War I. I had no idea that the 42nd Rainbow Division played a significant role in the outcome of the war until I began reading more about it. For a broad look at the…

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I never knew. I don’t think most of us did during Granddaddy’s lifetime. Many years after his death, I learned that Granddaddy had fought in France in World War I when my Dad showed me some of his WWI memorabilia. I’ve begun piecing together more of his service over the past few years but have recently had my eyes truly opened. I never knew or appreciated what Granddaddy experienced. I wish I could have told him thank you. Granddaddy Bill was allegedly only 17 when…

Blog Posts McCune

The rumor that’s circulated for many years in the family is that Granddaddy Bill fudged his birth date in order to join the Army during World War I because he was under age. His Social Security Death Index, State of Georgia death certificate 1 and cemetery headstone all state 13 Jan 1898 as his birth date. His WWI service card shows that he joined the Alabama National Guard 3 Jul 1916 and stated his age as 18. 2  Proof enough that he was indeed 18…

Blog Posts McCune

In the 1920-30s in the Southeast, textile mills ruled the manufacturing industry. Close on its heels were the burgeoning electric power companies lighting up the cities and rural towns. Both industries sought ways to lure workers, and one of the most popular was sponsoring commercial ball teams. In fact, according to Daddy, Granddaddy Bill McCune moved his family from Columbus to Manchester, GA, when he was recruited by the local textile mill based on his baseball skills. A bit strange to us nowadays, but they…

Blog Posts McCune

On a hot, humid evening in a small, west-central Georgia city skirted by the murky Chattahoochee waters, a batter approaches home plate, knocking the red dust from his scruffy shoes with the tip of his wooden bat. Bottom of the ninth, and it’s now or never. Removing his cap to wipe the sweat from his brow, he grounds his feet into the dirt at home plate setting up for his left-handed batter’s stance.  After warming up with a few practice swings, he faces the pitcher,…

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